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HELP SUPPORT MONGABAY.COM


Mongabay.com was founded by Rhett Ayers Butler in 1999 out of his passion for wildlife and rainforests. Originally a side project which consumed nights and weekends, Rhett quit his day job to run mongabay full-time in 2004. In March 2009 Jeremy Hance became mongabay's first hire.

Mongabay is financed primarily through advertising, the majority of which is served by Google. However some of mongabay's most important projects, including the kids education initiative and our news reporting, now require resources that are unfortunately not fully met by advertising revenue. Therefore in June 2012 Mongabay.com launched a non-profit organization: mongabay.org, which as a public charity has tax-exempt status under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Contributions to Mongabay.org are deductible to U.S. taxpayers under section 170 of the Code.

If you like our service, we would be grateful for your support.

DONATIONS


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If you are interested in making a direct donation online, you can use Paypal (secure and does not require an account) or Google Checkout. We have two options, a one-time donation and a monthly donation.

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We have a mailing address for checks:
    Mongabay.org
    P.O. BOX 0291,
    MENLO PARK, CA 94026-0291
    USA

We will provide you with documentation for any donations of $75.00 or more.


Why support Mongabay?



The purpose of mongabay is to raise interest in environmental issues and foster appreciation of wildlife and wild places. The site provides quality information on rainforests and environmental issues, reaching more than two million people per month. To learn more about the mission of mongabay, check out the preface of A Place Out of Time.

Mongabay.org has the specific mission of raising awareness about social and environmental issues relating to forests and other ecosystems. It has five focal areas:, which are explained here.

How can I help?



You can show your support of several ways.

Financial contributions.

Other ways to help.
  1. Volunteering.

    We have several projects for volunteers ranging from translation of a children's text about rainforests (currently available in nearly 40 languages) to social media. If you are interested in learning more, please check out our volunteering/internship page.

  2. Buying through Amazon links.

    You can use the following Amazon link to buy books, music and other merchandise from Amazon.com. Each time you use this link to make a purchase a small amount (1-5% depending on the item) will go towards maintaining the site. You can also take a look at the recommended books page for book ideas.

  3. Our book for kids and adults.

    Rainforests by Rhett Ayers Butler, founder and editor of mongabay.com. An overview of tropical rainforests for kids, based on mongabay.com's popular web site for children (kids.mongabay.com). Rainforests describes tropical rainforests, why they are important, and what is happening to them.

  4. Mongabay gear.

    You can buy mongabay.com and wildmadagascar.org apparel. A portion of each sale goes to the site. The most popular design is:

    Front

    Back

    Save Madagascar T-shirt

    This shirt features pictures of wildlife from Madagascar. It includes both the English name and Malagasy name for several animals.


    Other designs can be found at mongabay.com apparel and animals of madagascar designs

Cancel monthly donations to mongabay

If you'd like to cancel your recurring donation to mongabay.com, please use this link.



Mongabay's Rhett Butler
Rhett Butler, mongabay founder and director.


Rhett's inspiration, as told at TEDxYouth

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Reeling in religious messages: how faith impacts fisheries in Fiji
(11/25/2014) Marrying religion and conservation could be key to making Fiji's fisheries sustainable. Fijians have strong religious beliefs, which were primarily introduced by Christian missionaries in the 1835, and today profoundly guide their daily lives. Fijians primarily depend on fisheries close to shore for their survival, which is the case for most small Pacific island countries.


Jane Goodall: 5 reasons to have hope for the planet
(11/19/2014) Jane Goodall is not only arguably the most famous conservationist who ever lived, but also the most well-known and respected female scientist on the planet today. Her path to reach that stature is an unlikely as it is inspiring. Told to 'never give up' by her mother, Goodall set out in her 20s to pursue her childhood dream: to live with animals in Africa. By the time she was 26 she doing just this.


A tale of 2 Perus: Climate Summit host, 57 murdered environmentalists
(11/18/2014) On September 1st, indigenous activist, Edwin Chota, and three other indigenous leaders were gunned down and their bodies thrown into rivers. Chota, an internationally-known leader of the Asháninka in Peru, had warned several times that his life was on the line for his vocal stance against the destruction of his peoples' forests, yet the Peruvian government did nothing to protect him—or others.


Using games to teach kids the value of nature and philanthropy
(11/18/2014) Kids are spending more time using tablets and smart phones for learning and entertainment. But hours spent gaming, Tweeting, and playing on Instagram and Facebook, may mean less engagement with nature, potentially making it more difficult for conservation organizations to inspire and influence the next generation of donors and decision makers. Given the state of the world's environment, that is a troubling thought.


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