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HELP SUPPORT MONGABAY.COM


Mongabay.com was founded by Rhett Ayers Butler in 1999 out of his passion for wildlife and rainforests. Originally a side project which consumed nights and weekends, Rhett quit his day job to run mongabay full-time in 2004. In March 2009 Jeremy Hance became mongabay's first hire.

Mongabay is financed primarily through advertising, the majority of which is served by Google. However some of mongabay's most important projects, including the kids education initiative and our news reporting, now require resources that are unfortunately not fully met by advertising revenue. Therefore in June 2012 Mongabay.com launched a non-profit organization: mongabay.org, which as a public charity has tax-exempt status under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Contributions to Mongabay.org are deductible to U.S. taxpayers under section 170 of the Code.

If you like our service, we would be grateful for your support.

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If you are interested in making a direct donation online, you can use Paypal (secure and does not require an account) or Google Checkout. We have two options, a one-time donation and a monthly donation.

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We have a mailing address for checks:
    Mongabay.org
    P.O. BOX 0291,
    MENLO PARK, CA 94026-0291
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We will provide you with documentation for any donations of $75.00 or more.


Why support Mongabay?



The purpose of mongabay is to raise interest in environmental issues and foster appreciation of wildlife and wild places. The site provides quality information on rainforests and environmental issues, reaching more than two million people per month. To learn more about the mission of mongabay, check out the preface of A Place Out of Time.

Mongabay.org has the specific mission of raising awareness about social and environmental issues relating to forests and other ecosystems. It has five focal areas:, which are explained here.

How can I help?



You can show your support of several ways.

Financial contributions.

Other ways to help.
  1. Volunteering.

    We have several projects for volunteers ranging from translation of a children's text about rainforests (currently available in nearly 40 languages) to social media. If you are interested in learning more, please check out our volunteering/internship page.

  2. Buying through Amazon links.

    You can use the following Amazon link to buy books, music and other merchandise from Amazon.com. Each time you use this link to make a purchase a small amount (1-5% depending on the item) will go towards maintaining the site. You can also take a look at the recommended books page for book ideas.

  3. Our book for kids and adults.

    Rainforests by Rhett Ayers Butler, founder and editor of mongabay.com. An overview of tropical rainforests for kids, based on mongabay.com's popular web site for children (kids.mongabay.com). Rainforests describes tropical rainforests, why they are important, and what is happening to them.

  4. Mongabay gear.

    You can buy mongabay.com and wildmadagascar.org apparel. A portion of each sale goes to the site. The most popular design is:

    Front

    Back

    Save Madagascar T-shirt

    This shirt features pictures of wildlife from Madagascar. It includes both the English name and Malagasy name for several animals.


    Other designs can be found at mongabay.com apparel and animals of madagascar designs

Cancel monthly donations to mongabay

If you'd like to cancel your recurring donation to mongabay.com, please use this link.



Mongabay's Rhett Butler
Rhett Butler, mongabay founder and director.


Rhett's inspiration, as told at TEDxYouth

Recent features

Photos: expedition to Amazon’s white sands may have found new primate
(03/24/2015) Most people think of the Amazon rainforest as one massive, homogenous ecosystem—a giant castle of green. However, within the Amazon rainforest lie a myriad of distinct ecosystems, sporting unique characteristics and harboring endemic species. One of the rarer ecosystems in the Amazon is the white sands forest.


Who's funding palm oil?
(03/19/2015) Palm oil may be the single most important crop that you never heard of. A vegetable fat that resembles reddish butter at room temperature, palm oil is derived from the fruit of the oil palm tree. Both nutritious and highly versatile, palm oil is now an important component of products ranging from biofuels and food to soaps and cosmetics. Estimates indicate that as much as 50 percent of the products used by the average Western consumer every day contain palm oil or its derivatives.


Discovery of 'Lost City' spurs conservation pledge
(03/18/2015) Earlier this month, National Geographic made big news: the discovery of what it called a 'lost city' below the thick jungles of Honduras. While the coverage has led to scientists crying sensationalism, it also resulted this week in a commitment of protection by the Honduras President, Juan Orlando Hernández, for a long-neglected portion of the country.


New study argues the Anthropocene began in 1610
(03/11/2015) In 1610, William Shakespeare began penning one of his greatest plays, The Tempest, which some critics view as a commentary on European colonization of far-away islands and continents. Along those lines, a study today in Nature argues that 1610 is the first year of the human-dominated epoch, known as the Anthropocene, due to the upheavals caused by the 'discovery' of the New World.


Human impacts are 'decoupling' coral reef ecosystems
(03/09/2015) There is a growing consensus among scientists that we have entered the age of the Anthropocene, or the epoch of humans. In other words, at some point between the 12,000 years separating the beginning of agriculture and the Industrial Revolution, humans became the dominant source of change on the planet, shaping everything from the land to the atmosphere to even the geologic record where we etch our reign.


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