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HELP SUPPORT MONGABAY.COM


Mongabay.com was founded by Rhett Ayers Butler in 1999 out of his passion for wildlife and rainforests. Originally a side project which consumed nights and weekends, Rhett quit his day job to run mongabay full-time in 2004. In March 2009 Jeremy Hance became mongabay's first hire.

Mongabay is financed primarily through advertising, the majority of which is served by Google. However some of mongabay's most important projects, including the kids education initiative and our news reporting, now require resources that are unfortunately not fully met by advertising revenue. Therefore in June 2012 Mongabay.com launched a non-profit organization: mongabay.org, which as a public charity has tax-exempt status under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Contributions to Mongabay.org are deductible to U.S. taxpayers under section 170 of the Code.

If you like our service, we would be grateful for your support.

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If you are interested in making a direct donation online, you can use Paypal (secure and does not require an account) or Google Checkout. We have two options, a one-time donation and a monthly donation.

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We have a mailing address for checks:
    Mongabay.org
    P.O. BOX 0291,
    MENLO PARK, CA 94026-0291
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We will provide you with documentation for any donations of $75.00 or more.


Why support Mongabay?



The purpose of mongabay is to raise interest in environmental issues and foster appreciation of wildlife and wild places. The site provides quality information on rainforests and environmental issues, reaching more than two million people per month. To learn more about the mission of mongabay, check out the preface of A Place Out of Time.

Mongabay.org has the specific mission of raising awareness about social and environmental issues relating to forests and other ecosystems. It has five focal areas:, which are explained here.

How can I help?



You can show your support of several ways.

Financial contributions.

Other ways to help.
  1. Volunteering.

    We have several projects for volunteers ranging from translation of a children's text about rainforests (currently available in nearly 40 languages) to social media. If you are interested in learning more, please check out our volunteering/internship page.

  2. Buying through Amazon links.

    You can use the following Amazon link to buy books, music and other merchandise from Amazon.com. Each time you use this link to make a purchase a small amount (1-5% depending on the item) will go towards maintaining the site. You can also take a look at the recommended books page for book ideas.

  3. Our book for kids and adults.

    Rainforests by Rhett Ayers Butler, founder and editor of mongabay.com. An overview of tropical rainforests for kids, based on mongabay.com's popular web site for children (kids.mongabay.com). Rainforests describes tropical rainforests, why they are important, and what is happening to them.

  4. Mongabay gear.

    You can buy mongabay.com and wildmadagascar.org apparel. A portion of each sale goes to the site. The most popular design is:

    Front

    Back

    Save Madagascar T-shirt

    This shirt features pictures of wildlife from Madagascar. It includes both the English name and Malagasy name for several animals.


    Other designs can be found at mongabay.com apparel and animals of madagascar designs

Cancel monthly donations to mongabay

If you'd like to cancel your recurring donation to mongabay.com, please use this link.



Mongabay's Rhett Butler
Rhett Butler, mongabay founder and director.


Rhett's inspiration, as told at TEDxYouth

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Rainforest loss increased in the 2000s, concludes new analysis
(02/25/2015) Loss of tropical forests accelerated roughly 60 percent during the 2000s, argues a paper published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The findings contradict previous research suggesting that deforestation slowed since the 1990s. The study is based on a map of 1990 forest cover developed last year by Do-Hyung Kim and colleagues from the University of Maryland. The map, which includes 34 countries that contain 80 percent of the world's tropical forests, enabled the researchers to establish a consistent baseline for tracking forest cover change across regions and countries over time.


Partnering for conservation benefits Tacana people, Bolivian park
(02/25/2015) Kneeling in a small clearing amid tropical trees, Baldemar Mazaro skillfully arranges a circle of sticks and a noose of cord in the community of San Miguel de Bala. He hands a branch to a tourist and asks her to prod the sticks as if the branch were the nose of an animal snuffling around, looking for food.


$7 million could save lemurs from extinction
(02/25/2015) Last year, scientists released an emergency three-year plan that they argued could, quite literally, save the world's lemurs from mass extinction. Costing just $7.6 million, the plan focused on setting up better protections in 30 lemur hotspots. However, there was one sticking point: donating to small programs in one of the world's poorest countries was not exactly user friendly.


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