Rainforests | Tropical fish | Environmental news | For kids | Madagascar | Photos | Mongabay-Indonesia | Languages | TCS Journal | Deforestation Tracker

HELP SUPPORT MONGABAY.COM


Mongabay.com was founded by Rhett Ayers Butler in 1999 out of his passion for wildlife and rainforests. Originally a side project which consumed nights and weekends, Rhett quit his day job to run mongabay full-time in 2004. In March 2009 Jeremy Hance became mongabay's first hire.

Mongabay is financed primarily through advertising, the majority of which is served by Google. However some of mongabay's most important projects, including the kids education initiative and our news reporting, now require resources that are unfortunately not fully met by advertising revenue. Therefore in June 2012 Mongabay.com launched a non-profit organization: mongabay.org, which as a public charity has tax-exempt status under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Contributions to Mongabay.org are deductible to U.S. taxpayers under section 170 of the Code.

If you like our service, we would be grateful for your support.

DONATIONS


BY CREDIT CARD    

If you are interested in making a direct donation online, you can use Paypal (secure and does not require an account) or Google Checkout. We have two options, a one-time donation and a monthly donation.

ONE-TIME DONATION
Paypal (no account required)

Google Checkout/Wallet
$
ONE-TIME DONATION
RECURRING MONTHLY DONATION
How would you like your funds used?

BY CHECK


We have a mailing address for checks:
    Mongabay.org
    P.O. BOX 0291,
    MENLO PARK, CA 94026-0291
    USA

We will provide you with documentation for any donations of $75.00 or more.


Why support Mongabay?



The purpose of mongabay is to raise interest in environmental issues and foster appreciation of wildlife and wild places. The site provides quality information on rainforests and environmental issues, reaching more than two million people per month. To learn more about the mission of mongabay, check out the preface of A Place Out of Time.

Mongabay.org has the specific mission of raising awareness about social and environmental issues relating to forests and other ecosystems. It has five focal areas:, which are explained here.

How can I help?



You can show your support of several ways.

Financial contributions.

Other ways to help.
  1. Volunteering.

    We have several projects for volunteers ranging from translation of a children's text about rainforests (currently available in nearly 40 languages) to social media. If you are interested in learning more, please check out our volunteering/internship page.

  2. Buying through Amazon links.

    You can use the following Amazon link to buy books, music and other merchandise from Amazon.com. Each time you use this link to make a purchase a small amount (1-5% depending on the item) will go towards maintaining the site. You can also take a look at the recommended books page for book ideas.

  3. Our book for kids and adults.

    Rainforests by Rhett Ayers Butler, founder and editor of mongabay.com. An overview of tropical rainforests for kids, based on mongabay.com's popular web site for children (kids.mongabay.com). Rainforests describes tropical rainforests, why they are important, and what is happening to them.

  4. Mongabay gear.

    You can buy mongabay.com and wildmadagascar.org apparel. A portion of each sale goes to the site. The most popular design is:

    Front

    Back

    Save Madagascar T-shirt

    This shirt features pictures of wildlife from Madagascar. It includes both the English name and Malagasy name for several animals.


    Other designs can be found at mongabay.com apparel and animals of madagascar designs

Cancel monthly donations to mongabay

If you'd like to cancel your recurring donation to mongabay.com, please use this link.



Mongabay's Rhett Butler
Rhett Butler, mongabay founder and director.


Rhett's inspiration, as told at TEDxYouth

Recent features

Why conservationists need a little hope: saving themselves from becoming the most depressing scientists on the planet
(08/19/2014) Here's a challenge: take a conservationist out for a drink and ask them about their work. Nine times out of ten—or possibly more—you'll walk away feeling frustrated, despondent, and utterly hopeless. Yet a few conservation scientist are not just trying to save species from extinction, but also working to save their field—their life's work—from slipping into total despair.


Logging of Russian Far East damaging tiger habitat, few intact forests protected (Part I)
(08/19/2014) The destruction of Russian forests to supply timber to international markets is becoming one of the biggest threats to the world’s largest cat, the Siberian tiger. Russia has more forests than any other country, with more than half of the world’s coniferous forests. However, worldwide demand for high quality timber, along with weak regulations, has led to widespread logging of Russia’s trees.


Nothing else left to log: are eco-certified timber companies stripping Russia of its last old growth forests?
(08/15/2014) Among Russia’s forested lands lie intact forest landscapes (or IFLs). These IFLs are large swaths of unbroken, old growth forests that encompass at least 50,000 hectares, harbor high biodiversity, and have remained mostly undisturbed by development. However, less than 10 percent of the world’s IFLs are currently protected. Now, a new report reveals Russia's IFLs may be threatened by certified sustainable logging companies.


'Natural Reserves' no more: illegal colonists deforest huge portions of Nicaraguan protected areas
(08/13/2014) In southeastern Nicaragua, abutting the coastal Caribbean town of Bluefields, lie two nature reserves - Cerro Silva and Punta Gorda - that are embroiled in a bitter battle for survival against the speedily encroaching agricultural frontier. The forest is all but decimated here, with disconnected patches whose very existence rests precariously in the hands of its occupiers - both legal and illegal.


Unreal Thailand: stunning wildlife photographed in flooded Khlong Saeng Wildlife Sanctuary
(08/13/2014) If someone told you there was a place where 200 million year old coral reefs had erupted from beneath the sea and were now draped in the oldest rain forest in the world, a place where marbled cats and clouded leopards prowl the sharp crags and their dark caves in search of dead bats and small prey, would you believe them?


WEEKLY NEWSLETTER


Email:


About | Copyright & Use | Privacy | Advertising | Contact


About | Privacy
Copyright Rhett Butler 2012