References


Chapter 2:

The opening quotation is found in One River (New York: Touchstone, 1996) by Wade Davis.

Timme, S. ("Neotropical Plants and Ecology," Rainforest Workshop Packet 1994) pegs transpiration of individual canopy trees at 200 gallons of water per year - translating to 20,000 gallons transpired per acre of forest.

Newman, A. in Tropical Rainforest, a world survey of our most valuable and endangered habitat with a blue print for its survival (New York: Facts on File, 1990) notes that large rainforests create as much as 75% of their own rain.

The Woods Hole Research Center concluded in its RisQue98 (Risco de Queimada, or "Risk of Burning" in Amazonia - 1998) that as much as 50% of the Amazon rainforest was at risk of burning. The report was picked up by the popular media in Lewan, Todd. "Fears of a fiery Amazon nightmare-7-year study has implications for the global warming debate," Associated Press, 12/7/97.

Two-thirds of the world's rainforests are fragmented according to M. McKloskey in "Note on the Fragmentation of Primary Rainforest," Ambio 22 (4), June: 250-51 1993.

Paine, R. T. ("Food web complexity and species diversity" American Naturalist 100: 65-75, 1966) put forth the notion of a keystone species. Further discussion of the term can be found in Power, M. E., et al., "Challenges in the quest for keystones," BioScience 46: 609-620, 1996; and Khanina, L., "Determining keystone species," Conservation Ecology 2(2), 1998.
 
 

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