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Sulawesi
By Jeremy Hance


No location in Sulawesi is more than 100 km from the coast. Map by Rhett A. Butler

Sections:

Forest condition on the island of Sulawesi. A composite of 32 Landsat images was manually classified based upon both visual inspection and the results from several remote-sensing techniques. The 'converted' class includes all sites that are completely dominated by human activity, including urban areas and regions of intensive agriculture and plantations. Image and caption courtesy of Canon, et. al (2007).


NEWS on SULAWESI  



Indonesia developing mega coal mine five times larger than Singapore
(10/20/2014) Global miner BHP Billiton and Indonesian partner PT Adaro are developing what could become the single largest mine in Indonesia in terms of land area, with BHP owning 75 percent. The IndoMet mine complex in Central and East Kalimantan provinces on Borneo comprises seven coal concessions, which cover 350,000 hectares, or about five times the size of Singapore.


Indonesia’s tough choice: capping coal as Asian demand grows
(10/17/2014) Indonesia cannot build power stations fast enough. And neither can most of its Asian neighbors. Rapid economic and population growth are driving equally rapid demands for electricity as the region builds out power grids to connect up millions of people to fuel prosperity.


Indonesia tries to clamp down on coal sector’s worst excesses
(10/16/2014) Out of the jungles of East Borneo in Indonesia comes the fire that fuels Asia’s burgeoning economies: coal. Miners dig deep open pits, clearing forests and farmlands to extract coal from thick black seams, which is then crushed and loaded onto trucks and barges for shipment to China, India, Japan and other destinations in Asia.


What lies within, we may never know: deforestation threatening Sulawesi’s unique wildlife
(08/26/2014) For 10 million years the Indonesian island of Sulawesi has been disconnected from other landforms, almost inviting evolution to color outside the lines. Despite a growing population and limited space, Sulawesi has managed to provide a safe haven to hundreds of unique species as they evolved over millennia. But that haven may soon be lost to uncontrolled extraction of forest products from Sulawesi’s many pristine ecosystems.


Indonesia to hear indigenous peoples' grievances on land disputes
(08/22/2014) Public hearings into alleged violations of indigenous peoples' land rights will open next week in Palu on the island of Sulawesi. This is the beginning of a series of hearings by the Commission on Human Rights to explore conflicts affecting indigenous people in forest areas. The Commission will travel throughout Indonesia, providing concerned parties an opportunity to meet and discuss land disputes, before submitting the results of their findings to the next president.


A tale of two fish: cyanide fishing and foreign bosses off Sulawesi's coast (Part I)
(07/08/2014) In spring and summer, after the monsoon storms have passed, the fishing boats set out again from tiny Kodingareng Island in the Spermonde Archipelago off the coast of South Sulawesi. In the afternoon heat, Abdul Wahid joins his fellow fishermen in the narrow shade of the beachfront village houses to check out the daily fish prices.


Scientists discover carnivorous water rat in Indonesia, good example of convergent evolution
(06/19/2014) Researchers have discovered a new carnivorous water rat on the island of Sulawesi that's so unique it represents an entirely new genus. They believe many more new rodent species await discovery in this relatively undisturbed part of Indonesia, but mining and other types of development may threaten vital habitat before it’s even surveyed.


Despite green pledge, Wilmar partner continues to destroy forest for palm oil
(06/12/2014) Two palm oil companies partially owned by Wilmar are continuing to destroy rainforests in Indonesia despite a high profile zero deforestation pledge, alleges a new report published by Greenomics.


Mining company attacks scuba diving tourists in Indonesia
(06/05/2014) Conflict from mining activities on Bangka Island off North Sulawesi, entered a new chapter after a local resort manager voiced concern over an incident involving its clients and mining staff last Saturday.


Colorful bird on remote Indonesian islands should be classified as distinct species, say scientists
(06/04/2014) A colorful bird found on the Wakatobi islands south of Sulawesi in Indonesia is sufficiently distinct from birds in nearby areas to be classified as a unique species, argue scientists writing in the current issue of the open-access journal PLoS ONE.


Uprising against illegal mining in Indonesia pits villagers against miners, police
(02/19/2014) Hundreds of villagers and fishermen on Bangka Island in North Sulawesi attempted to stop a ship owned by PT Mikgro Metal Perdana (MMP) from offloading heavy machinery to be used in mining operations. The Indonesian Supreme Court ruled in November that the company's mining permits, issued by the local government, should be invalidated.


Indonesia rejects, delays 1.3m ha of concessions due to moratorium
(02/12/2014) The Indonesian government has rejected nearly 932,000 hectares (2.3 million acres) of oil palm, timber, and logging concessions due to its moratorium on new permits across millions of hectares of peatlands and rainforests, reports Mongabay-Indonesia.


Mining in Indonesia taking a heavy social, environmental toll
(06/03/2013) In a patch of rainforest in northern Sumatra, a 28-year-old in jeans and tall rubber boots snubs out his cigarette and pulls a headlamp over his short black hair. Standing under a tarp, he flicks the light on and leans over the entrance of a narrow shaft lined with wooden planks that he and other miners cut from trees that once stood here. He gives a sharp tug on a rope that dangles 100 meters, plateauing in sections, and slides down. For hours, the man, Sarial, will use a pick to scrape away and bag rocks that are hauled to the surface by another miner, using a wooden wheel.


Cargill to boost investment in Indonesian oil palm plantations
(03/26/2013) Cargill plans to 'aggressively' expand its palm oil holdings in Sulawesi, Indonesian Borneo, and Sumatra, reports The Wall Street Journal.


Palm oil company thugs attack Sulawesi villagers, injuring 8
(02/06/2013) Local thugs, allegedly linked to an oil palm plantation company, attacked a group of villagers in Indonesia’s Gorontalo province on the island of Sulawesi last week, injuring eight people, including a woman and a small child.


Photos: Population of critically-endangered black macaque on rebound
(01/26/2013) An important population of critically endangered Sulawesi black macaques (Macaca nigra) is showing signs of recovery after years of decline in an Indonesian forest reserve, reports a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Primatology.


The world's 25 most endangered primates: nearly a quarter in Madagascar
(10/15/2012) A coalition of conservation groups released the biannual Top 25 Primates list today, including nine species not appearing on the 2010 list, at the UN's Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in Hyderabad, India. Madagascar tops the list as home to the most threatened primates, including six on the list. Following Madagascar, Vietnam contains five, Indonesia three, and Brazil two. In all, over half (54 percent) of the world's primates, which have been evaluated, are considered threatened by the IUCN Red List.


Bizarre new rodent discovered in Indonesia has only 2 teeth
(08/22/2012) The Indonesian island of Sulawesi is a workshop of bizarre evolutionary experiments. Think of the babirusa, pig-like species with tusks that puncture their snouts; or the maleo, a ground-bird that lays its eggs in geothermal heated sand; or the anoa, the world's smallest wild cattle. Now the island, made up of four intersecting peninsulas, can add another bizarre creature to its menagerie of marvels: the Paucidentomys vermidax, a new species of rodent that is different from all others.


New mammal discovered in Indonesia
(07/24/2012) Researchers have discovered a new species of rodent in Indonesia's Mekongga Mountains, reports the Jakarta Post. The new rodent, Christine's Margareta rat (Margaretamys christinae), is only the fourth in the genus Margaretamy, all of which are found on the island of Sulawesi.


Charts: deforestation in Indonesia and Malaysia, 2000-2010
(07/15/2012) Indonesia and Malaysia lost more than 11 million hectares (42,470 square miles) of forest between 2000 and 2010, according to a study published last year in the journal Global Change Biology. The area is roughly the size of Denmark or the state of Virginia. The bulk of forest loss occurred in lowland forests, which declined by 7.8 million hectares or 11 percent on 2000 cover. Peat swamp forests lost the highest percentage of cover, declining 19.7 percent. Lowland forests have historically been first targeted by loggers before being converted for agriculture. Peatlands are increasingly converted for industrial oil palm estates and pulp and paper plantations.


FACTS ON SULAWESI

Land Areas: 174,600 square kilometers, making it the world’s 11th largest island (67, 413 square miles, 17.4 million hectares, or 43 million acres)
Human Population: 16 million (2005)
Country: Indonesia
Biodiversity: 1450 birds, 127 mammals
Percent Forest Cover: Around 20%
Deforestation Rate: 2.35 percent annually between 1985-1997)
Causes of Deforestation: Agriculture, logging, and mining


OVERVIEW: SULAWESI

Shaped like a lower-case 'k', the Indonesian island of Sulawesi is the world’s eleventh largest island. A treasure-trove of biodiversity with a startling number of endemic species (species that are found no-where else in the world), Sulawesi—formerly known as Celebes—has only recently become a target of conservationists. While much of the island remains unstudied by researchers much of its forest habitat has already been lost.

The tropical forests—which once covered the whole island—have been broadly deforested by agriculture, logging, and mining. The process accelerated in the late 20th Century when the government began supporting commercial logging and large agriculture projects. Locals also began converting forests into cash crops.

A study in 2007 found that 80 percent of Sulawesi's forest is gone or degraded, including almost the entirety of Sulawesi’s rich lowland rainforest and mangroves. The study further speculated that little deforestation in the future is possible since most of forest land that was useful for cultivation and logging is already gone. With few attractive commercial trees, Sulawesi’s highland forests have fared better, though many have suffered from degradation.

SULAWESI'S GEOGRAPHY  


At 174,600 square kilometers, Sulawesi is the world's eleventh largest island just after Ellesmere Island in Canada. It is famously described as a big island with no interior, given that the island consists almost entirely of four interconnecting peninsulas.

Its large and winding coastline measures 6,000 kilometers. The island is surrounded on all sides by other big islands: Borneo to the west, Philippines to the north, the Maluku islands to the east, and Flores and Timor to the south.

Politically, Sulawesi is split into six Indonesian provinces: Mamuju (West Sulawesi), Manado (North Sulawesi), Palu (Central Sulawesi), Makassar (South Sulawesi), Kendari (Southeast Sulawesi), and Gorontalo. With 1.25 million people, Makassar is the largest city on the island; it rests on the southwestern peninsula.

The strange shape of Sulawesi—five connected peninsulas with little to hold them together—was created by a collision of multiple plates originating from Asia, Australia, and the Pacific islands.

The island contains thirteen freshwater lakes including the deepest lake, Matano, in Southeast Asia.

SULAWESI'S ECONOMY

Sulawesi is largely dependent on crops and seafood for its economy: in 2004 agriculture made up 34 percent of Sulawesi's economy. Crops important to Sulawesi's economy include coconuts, nutmeg, soy, coffee, and rice. The island is one of the world's largest producers of cacao. It also produces a lot of cloves for kretek cigarettes.

Fishing, and increasingly aquaculture, has become important to Sulawesi's economy. Fish ponds and shrimp aquaculture has replaced much of the island's mangroves.

Other economic industries include commercial timber such as teak and rattan and tourism, which is seen as increasingly important by the government.

In 2004, 16.7 percent of Sulawesi's population were considered to be living in poverty. Most of the poor live in rural areas.

BIODIVERSITY PROFILE OF SULAWESI   


Sulawesi has a remarkable diversity of terrestrial flora and fauna and rich coastal marine life. Since the unique island sits on Wallace's Line it harbors species of both Asian and Australasian ancestors, though the majority are Australasian in origin.

On land, the percentage of endemic species is particularly noteworthy. Of 127 known mammals, 72 are endemic, making for one of the highest rates of endemic mammals in the world (62 percent). When bats are excluded—since they have better potential for migration—the percentage leaps to an astounding 98 percent. In addition, 34 percent of Sulawesi’s nearly 1500 birds are endemic.

Other fauna are unfortunately little studied. Twenty-five species of amphibian are known, forty lizards, and at least 52 terrestrial snakes. In addition, there are 38 species of large swallow-tailed butterfly, which so entranced Alfred Russell Wallace on his visit to the island. Researchers have also found 67 endemic species of fish in Sulawesi's dwindling mangrove forests.

Some standouts include:
  • Two wild cattle species, the Lowland anoa and the Mountain anoa. Both are listed as Endangered by the IUCN, little is known about these animals but they are heavily hunted for food and their horns.
  • The babirusa, also known as 'pig-deer, comprises three species of pig. Each male babirusa sports a set of four tusks, two of which stick through their snout. All three species are threatened with extinction.
  • The mysterious and little-studied Sulawesi palm civet which is classified as Vulnerable. This predator lives and hunts in a wide-variety of habitats.
  • The Crested black macaque is called the most threatened primate on Sulawesi. It is killed for bushmeat and caught for the pet trade. In addition, deforestation and mining have taken a large toll on its habitat. They used to occur in groups of over 100, but no longer. The species is considered Critically Endangered.
  • The maleo is an Endangered chicken-sized bird. They nest in traditional sites, over a third of which have been abandoned recently due to human impact. They lay one massive egg in meter-deep pits, which humans sometimes poach for food.
Newly discovered species include the Togian White-eye, a small olive black and white passerine, which is likely endangered; the Togian hawk-owl in 2004; a rediscovered species of pygmy tarsier in 2000; and fifteen new species of beetles in 2005.

The island's biodiversity is ripe for more discovery and study.



MARINE PROFILE  

Sulawesi is surrounded by rich seas with large habitats of seagrass and coral reefs. These habitats are home to leatherback, hawksbill, and green sea turtles, as well as dugongs and six of the world's seven giant clam species. Whales that use the waters as a by-way include sperm whales, pygmy sperm whales, and killer whales.

One of the marine biodiversity standouts is the Sulawesi coelacanth. This is the second species of the prehistoric survivor and is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List because it is threatened as bycatch. The coelacanth is not a target for fishermen.

SULAWESI’S FORESTS  

Sulawesi has a startling diversity of forest types: fourteen different forest ecosystems have been identified. The wide diversity of forests is part of the reason for the islands high rate of endemism and biodiversity.

Mangrove forests: found in estuaries and along Sulawesi's large coastline. At one time mangroves covered much of the coastlines, but most of these have been lost.

Montane forests: rising above 1,000 meters these forests are some of the most intact forests in Sulawesi. Lower montane forests are primarily made up of oak and chestnut species, while upper montane forests support a variety of conifers.

Monsoon forests: this unique forest type is little-studied. It receives the lowest amount of rain in all Indonesia and is able to survive long droughts. However, much of this forest type has been lost to grazing land.

Ultrabasic forests: a unique forest type that grows on nutrient-poor ultrabasic soil with little plant diversity, but high endemism since unique plants—like pitcher plants—have evolved to fill this niche. Ultrabasic forests are made up of short twisted trees. Few fauna live here.

Limestone forests: shallow soil and steep slopes make these forests low both in abundance and diversity. They are home to some endemic species like snails.

Peat swamp forest: though Sulawesi only has small areas of peat swamp forests they contain high biodiversity, especially of birds.

Freshwater swamp forests: like peat swamp forests, freshwater forests only cover a small area of Sulawesi. They are made up of palms, pandans, and pitcher plants.

FOREST LOSS IN SULAWESI   

Approximately 80 percent of Sulawesi's forests are either gone or degraded to some degree. Over 50 percent are considered in poor condition, while 30 percent—mostly in the highlands (above 1500 meters)—are classified as in good condition.

Over 95 percent of Sulawesi's mangrove forests and lowland forests are disturbed. In less than a decade—between the mid 1980s and 1993—Sulawesi mangroves have been decreased by over 60 percent in part due to aquaculture for seafood such as shrimp.

Wetlands have suffered even worse: 99 percent of the island's wetlands are either gone or damaged.

Current rates of forest loss are lower than much of Indonesia, but this is primarily because much of the island's lowland forest was already gone by as early as 1985.

Forest loss is due primarily to logging and conversion. Beginning in the 1970s the government began supporting large-scale logging and vast agricultural projects. Since then migrants from urban areas to the countryside have converted large tracks of forest into cash crops such as coffee and cacao.

CURRENT THREATS  

Large-scale loss of forest is not as big of a threat in Sulawesi as other islands in Indonesia, simply because there is relatively little forest left. However, deforestation of remaining forest would be catastrophic for the island's unique biodiversity, much of which are already threatened.

Since montane forests contain very few commercial species, they are relatively safe from loggers, but hunting, fires, and erosion due to cleared areas remain major threats.

Pollution and habitat destruction from mining poses a threat to biodiversity and ecosystem health. Mining is even reported to occur within the boundaries of protected areas.

Bushmeat hunting and poaching is a large issue for a number of endangered species, including anoa, babirusa, black crested macaques, and the maleo since its eggs are poached.

South Sulawesi, as opposed to north and central, is serviced by few parks and protected areas, leaving species and forests there particularly vulnerable.

PROTECTED AREAS   

Sulawesi has six national parks and nineteen nature reserves.

Central Sulawesi contains the most well-known park on the island, Lore Lindu National Park spanning 229,000 hectares. It is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

On the northern peninsula, Bogani Nani Wartabone National Park protects 300,000 square hectares, while Rawa Aopa Watmohai National Park protects 105,194 hectares in southeast Sulawesi.

Most of the parks, however, suffer frequent encroachment for illegal logging, mining, and even conversion into crops. Thousands of illegal gold miners have been found plying their trade in Bogani Nani Wartabone National Park.

Sulawesi also has three national marine parks: Bunaken, Wakatobi, and Take Bonerate.

Bunaken National Park includes islands, mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs. Taka Bonerate National Park protects the Taka Bonerate atoll (and surrounding coral reefs), the world's third largest atoll and the largest in Southeast Asia. Last but not least, Wakatobi National Park is made up of island chains and 25 coral reefs.

PHOTOS FROM SULAWESI   

Rice fields (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Rice fields


Muddy rice fields in Tana Toraja (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Muddy rice fields in Tana Toraja


Rice fields planted on former mangrove forest land (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Rice fields planted on former mangrove forest land


Tombs carved in a rock face at Lemo (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Tombs carved in a rock face at Lemo


Rice fields at Lemo (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Rice fields at Lemo


Little girls at Lemo (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Little girls at Lemo


Giant bamboo (Dendrocalamus giganteus) (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Giant bamboo (Dendrocalamus giganteus)


Deep red millipede on forest floor (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Deep red millipede on forest floor


Tau-Tau Effigies at Londa Nanggala (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Tau-Tau Effigies at Londa Nanggala


Top breed white water buffalo (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Top breed white water buffalo


Red anchovies at fish market in Rantepao (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Red anchovies at fish market in Rantepao


Palawa village (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Palawa village


Rice fields near Batutomonga village  (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Rice fields near Batutomonga village


Yellow and brown toad in Sulawesi (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Yellow and brown toad in Sulawesi.


Orange orchid with magenta spots (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Orange orchid with magenta spots


Pomelo (Jerunga) fruit (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Pomelo (Jerunga) fruit


Bamboo stakes placed to control water hyacinth at Lake Tempe (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Bamboo stakes placed to control water hyacinth at Lake Tempe. These bamboo tripods form bungkas, large man-made circles of floating vegetation. These serve as fish traps, attracting fish during the rainy seaons. As water levels drop towards the dry season, a fine bamboo fence is built around the bungka, trapping the fish.


Lowland rice paddies of Sulawesi (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Lowland rice paddies of Sulawesi


Emerald green rice paddies of south Sulawesi (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Emerald green rice paddies of south Sulawesi


Emerald green rice terraces of south Sulawesi (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Emerald green rice terraces of south Sulawesi


Colorful house among green rice fields of south Sulawesi (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Colorful house among green rice fields of south Sulawesi


Colorful house among green rice paddies (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Colorful house among green rice paddies


Sulawesi home outside of Makassar (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Sulawesi home outside of Makassar


Riverside village downriver from Bantimurung falls (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Riverside village downriver from Bantimurung falls


Muddy rice fields near Ketu Kese (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Muddy rice fields near Ketu Kese


Sulawesi home outside of Ujung Pandang (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Sulawesi home outside of Ujung Pandang


Iridescent turquoise and black butterfly in hand (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Iridescent turquoise and black butterfly in hand.


Mountain peak in South Sulawesi (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Mountain peak in South Sulawesi


Grey tree frog (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Grey tree frog


House gecko on yellow-orange background (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
House gecko on yellow-orange background


Terraced rice paddies of Batutomonga (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Terraced rice paddies of Batutomonga


Wooden effigies of the dead at Lemo (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Wooden effigies of the dead at Lemo


Wooden effigies of the dead in cliff walls at Lemo (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Wooden effigies of the dead in cliff walls at Lemo


Green cacao pods still on the tree (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Green cacao pods still on the tree. Cacao is cauliflorous, meaning the fruit grow directly out of the tree trunk and branches.


Rice fields at Lemo (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Rice fields at Lemo


Terraced rice fields of Batutomonga (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Terraced rice fields of Batutomonga


Woman planting in rice paddy (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Woman planting in rice paddy


Rice paddies near Batutomonga village  (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Rice paddies near Batutomonga village


Rice paddies near Batutomonga village  (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Rice paddies near Batutomonga village


Water buffalo in rice paddies near Batutomonga village  (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Water buffalo in rice paddies near Batutomonga village


Rice paddies at Batutomonga  (Toraja Land (Torajaland), Sulawesi)
Rice paddies at Batutomonga


Isolated mountain home in forests of Sulawesi (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Isolated mountain home in forests of Sulawesi


Vendor carrying all of his wares on the back of his motorbike (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Vendor carrying all of his wares on the back of his motorbike


Riverside huts along river draining Lake Tempe (Sulawesi (Celebes))
Riverside huts along river draining Lake Tempe




CITATIONS:   

  • Charles H. Cannon, Marcy Summers, John R. Harting, and Paul J.A. Kessler (2007). "Developing Conservation Priorities Based on Forest Type, Condition, and Threats in a Poorly Known Ecoregion: Sulawesi, Indonesia". Biotropica online 25 May to June 25, 2007.
  • Daws, Gavan and Marty Fujita. Archipelago: the Islands of Indonesia. University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles. 1999.
  • Erdmann, M. 2008. Latimeria menadoensis. In: IUCN 2009. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. www.iucnredlist.org.
  • Indonesian Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan, 2003.
  • Indonesia National Socioeconomic Survey (SUSENAS), 2004.
  • Report on Biodiversity and Tropical Forests in Indonesia, USAID/Indonesia, 2004. Prepared by : (1) Steve Rhee, M.E.Sc. (2) Darrell Kitchener, Ph.D. (3) Tim Brown, Ph.D. (4) Reed Merrill, M.Sc. (5) Russ Dilts, Ph.D. (6) Stacey Tighe, Ph.D.
  • Ruud de Lang, Gernot Vogel. The Snakes of Sulawesi. Herpetologia Bonnensis II. Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Societas Europaea Herpetologica. pp. 35-38. (2006)
  • Semiadi, G., Mannullang, B., Burton, J., Schreiber, A., Mustari, A.H. & the IUCN SSC Asian Wild Cattle Specialist Group 2008. Bubalus depressicornis. In: IUCN 2009. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. www.iucnredlist.org.
  • Supriatna, J. & Andayani, N. 2008. Macaca nigra. In: IUCN 2009. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. www.iucnredlist.org.




  • Copyright mongabay 2009


    Copyright Rhett Butler 2009