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Comanche

Information about the Comanche

Comanche-Part One
Comanches are believed to have been the first native people on the plains to utilize the horse ... Comanche herds also supplied Americans with mules for ...

Comanche Lodge - Learn the history of the Comanche Indians, Quanah ...
Comanche Lodge, Native American, Comanche Indians, Quanah Parker, American Indian, Nation, Native American, Indian, Genealogy, Treaties. ...

Comanche Lodge - Native American Indian Sign Language.
Native American Indian sign language.

Native American Seed - Wildflower Seeds and Native Prairie Grasses
One thing that distinguishes Native American Seed from many of ... and many other well known native species. ... with a little less rainfall, the Comanche Mix offers ...

Comanche Indians
Eventually agreeing to settle on the reservation in southwestern Oklahoma, Parker persuaded other Comanche bands to conform. ... NATIVE AMERICANS. ...

Comanche Native Americans - The USGenWeb Census Project
The USGenWeb Census Project Comanche Native Americans , Native American Coordinator. ...

Texas Indian Tribes
...a Republic and later State of the American Union ... The word Kadohadacho signifies in the native language "real ... At'-ta-wits, by the Comanche, according to Ten Kate ...

Wyoming Indian Tribes
Särĕt?ka, Comanche and Shoshoni name, signifying "dog eaters"; the Pawnee,. Wichita, and Ute names were forms of this. ... (See South Dakota.). Comanche. ...

Native Americans - Comanche
...any other Native American group. They were associated with the Kiowa, the Cheyenne, and the Arapaho in a loose confederacy. The Comanche, however, considered ...

Native Americans - Quanah Parker, Comanche Chief
Government, their main concern was to destroy all vestiges of Native American life and ... judge, lobbied Congress and pleaded the cause of the Comanche Nation. ...

Tribes and Nations
...largest and area reserved for Native Americans - 17 million ... major nomadic tribe in the American Southwest, the ... as well as their former enemies, the Comanche. ...

native americans comanche indians
From American Indian Tribe.com - http ... Comanche Indians ___An overview of this large Native group, plus a brief biography of war chief, Quanah Parker. ...

ReferenceResources:NativeAmericans
Chippewa (Ojibwe). Massachuset. Niantic. Susquehannock. Comanche. Mattabesic. Nipissing. Tionontati. ... A Listing of Native American Web Page Sites. ...

Home Pages for Individual Native Americans
Lell Caddo Chad Smith Cherokee Paul Chaat Smith Comanche Russ SpottedHorse Wes ... The Tragic Story of Louis Francis Sockalexis, the First Native American in Major ...

Marilee's Native Americans Resource - Individual Tribes
The Comanche (Native Americans) by Caryn Yacowitz, 2002 The Comanche Indians (Native Peoples) by Bill Lund, 1997 The Legend of the Bluebonnet by Tomie DePaola ...

Native American Tribes and Cultures
...of Texas, (6) Comanche Indians and Texas, (7) Comanche Indian, (8) Comanche History by ... 5) Miwok Information Modoc: (1) Modoc Indians: A Native American Saga, (2 ...

Native Americans
Because of changes in the climate of the region, the Jumanos were already declining in numbers when the Spanish arrived in the 16th century. A Comanche Warrior. ...

Carolyne's Native American Genealogy Helper - Native American ...
MS 1918- Kiowa, Comanche, Apache, Fort Sill Apache, Wichita, Caddo, and ... Grass. Design & contents © Carolyne Gould Carolyne's Native American Genealogy Helper ...

NativeWeb Resources: Native American Languages
...that works with American Indian nations to promote and preserve their native languages. Most recently, TWG Productions has been working with the Comanche of ...

Overstock.com, save up to 80% every day!
Comanche Kachina (Native American). ...

Comanche Language @ Buffalo Trails - Comanche Language Programs
...content owned and/or licensed by Native Americans @ Buffalo Trails! No duplication for commercial purposes allowed! Last modified: Comanche Language @ Buffalo ...

The University of Oklahoma Native American Studies
Lana Grant [Sac and Fox], Barbara T. Hobson [Comanche], Janet McAdams ... NWCA is maintained through the Native American Studies program at the University of ...

Who Is Indian? - Native American Culture
The Native American, the Indian, the Navajo - call him what you will - knows he is an Indian because of the mystic ... I had a Comanche Mother and an Irish father. ...

Behind the Name: Native American Names
QUANAH m Usage: English, Native American Pronounced: KWAH-na Means "fragrant" in the Comanche language. This was the name of a 19th ...

Yahoo! Directory United States > Native American > Comanche
Yahoo! reviewed these sites and found them related to United States > Native American > Comanche. ...

Native American Indian Myth and Folklore - Comanche - Comanche ...
Learn about Comanche Native American Indian Myth and Folklore, Native American Culture, Native American history, religion, spirituality, and mythology. ...

American Indian Language Resources
...of American Linguistics Papers on Native American Languages (Titles ... In the following Native languages: Alabama, Apache, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Dakota ...

30th Annual Symposium on the American Indian
United S. Army; US Navy; US Air Force; NATIVE AMERICAN MARINE CORPS ... Dedication - "Honoring Our Veterans"- Navajo and Comanche Code Talkers (invited); Ernest ...

Native American Authors: Comanche Tribe
...the Internet Public Library. Native American Authors: Browsing by Tribe. Comanche Tribe. Comanche Authors. ...

NativeTech: Native American Food and Recipes by Type of Dish
Native American Bacon Cherokee; Rainy Day Fish Chowder Haida - Tlingit; Salmon on a ... Stuffed Frybread Anishinaabe, MI; Shrimp & Corn Soup Comanche; Skok Salmon ...

Native American Indian Tribes
Choctaw. Choctaw. Choctaw Home Page. Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. Native American & Okie Page. Colville Confederated Tribes. Comanche. About ...

Native Americans
James Madison University Index of Native American Resources on ... comprehensive history of the Comanche, including history ... and has information on Native peoples in ...

Native American
Lawton Public Library. Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Collection. ... Family Record Book: Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Tribes, 1901, maintained by the Kiowa Agency. ...

Comanche Indian - Links and Resources
Native Americans in Film Comanche Flutes Rance Hood Art Gallery Digital Dreamcatchers Institute of American Indian Art Native Design Services Native Symbols. ...

Native American Languages - Lady Hawke's Site
NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGES. Links to Native American languages: ... Thank you,. Dee Redfeather Stewart. Vision Quest Native American Market. ...

Links to Native American Nations
Comanche Nation License Plate (Oklahoma). ... Ho-Chunk Casino - the Ho-Chunk have one of the best-known Native American casinos in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin. ...

Links Page
...the Comanche language on to present and future generations. Because federal government policies for years were designed to stamp out Native American languages ...

Native American - Indian Nations
Colville. Colville Tribes (Official Website). Comanche. ... The Museum of the Native American Resources Center, UNC Pembroke - lots of good oral history here! Lummi. ...

Native Americans in Garza County
Native Americans in Garza County Taba'na Yuan'e Garza Arrow Points: Apache, Comanche, Kiowa Indians. Page Sponsored by: WELLS FARGO BANK of Post, Texas. ...

Online Native American Indian Genealogy Records & Databases
Comanche: Comanche Census Lists. Creek: Creek Indian Research: Creek ... Michigan Native Americans History, 1887 (free, but requires registration). Minnesota (State ...

Native Americans
Chickasaw Native Americans - History of the tribe; Comanche Native Americans - History - Click on Part 2 at the bottom of the page for more information. ...

Native American Cultures Expedition
A gateway to information about 80 western Native American tribes visited ... www.npg.si.edu/col/native/blkhwk.htm. ... http://www.newigwam.com/johnonion.html Comanche. ...

Native American Project
Tape length: 1 hr. 30 min. A Comanche Native American describes relocation experience touching also upon such subjects as militancy and racial discrimination. ...

Comanche Indian Genealogy
Search Native American Nations. Tribes and Nations. Abenaki; Absentee Shawnees; Apache; Arapaho; Blackfeet; Caddo; Canada; Cherokee; Chickasaw; Chippewa; Choctaw ...

Directory of Native American & Craft Related Sites - Native ...
Comanche Lodge, Native American, Comanche Indians, Quanah Parker, Comanche Nation, Native American, Indian, Genealogy, Treaties.... ...

Directory of Native American & Craft Related Sites - Native ...
Free, ( Shalamar, Prince, Crown of Thorns, Gene Simmions and Paul Stanley of the rock group Kiss) a mixed blood Cherokee-Comanche Native American, and wife ...

Native American Indian Dance Ceremony Ceremonies
COMANCHE DANCE OF WOODCRAFT. SECOND COMANCHE DANCE OF ZUNI. COYOTE DANCE OF WOODCRAFT. ... TOM-TOM-ORCHESTRA. Alphabetical List of Native American "Indian" Songs. ...

Google Directory - Society > Ethnicity > The Americas > Indigenous ...
...www.comancheindian.com/ List of native radio and ... Comanche - http://college.hmco.com/ history/readerscomp/naind ... from the Encyclopedia of North American Indians. ...




More information from Wikipedia.org:
The Comanche Nation is a Native American group of approximately 10,000 members, about half of whom live in Oklahoma and the remainder concentrated in Texas, California, and New Mexico.

There are two accounts of the origin of the name Comanche, which is either a corruption of a Ute term, Komantcia, meaning "anyone who wants to fight me all the time," or of the Spanish camino ancho, meaning wide trail. They were also called Paducah by early French and American explorers, but their own preferred name is Numunuu, meaning "the People." They speak an Uto-Aztecan language, sometimes classified as a Shoshone dialect.

The Comanches emerged as a distinct group shortly before 1700, when they broke off from the Shoshone people living along the upper Platte River in Wyoming. This coincided with their acquisition of the horse, which allowed them greater mobility in their search for better hunting grounds. Their original migration took them to central plains, from where they moved southward into a sweep of territory extending from the Arkansas River to central Texas. During that time, their population increased dramatically due to the abundance of buffalo, an influx of Shoshone migrants, and the adoption of significant numbers of women and children taken captive from rival groups. Nevertheless, the Comanches never formed a single cohesive tribal unit, and were divided into almost a dozen autonomous groups, which shared the same language and culture, but might have fought among themselves just as often as they cooperated. These groups were very fluid and often joined together or separated, depending on circumstances.

The horse was a key element in the emergence of a distinctive Comanche culture, and there have even been suggestions that it was the search for additional sources of horses among the Mexican settlers to the south (rather than the search for new herds of buffalo) that first led the Comanches to break off the Shoshone. The Comanches may even have been the first group of Plains natives to fully incorporate the horse into their culture, and may have even introduced the animal to the other Plains peoples. By the mid-nineteenth century, they were also supplying horses to French and American traders and settlers and later to migrants passing through their territory on their way to California Gold Rush. Many of these horses were stolen, and the Comanches earned a reputation as formidable horse and later cattle thieves. Their victims included Spanish and America settlers, as well as the other Plains tribes, often leading to war. They were formidable opponents, who developed entire strategies for fighting on horseback with traditional weapons.

In fact, warfare was a major part of Comanche life. Their emergence around the turn of the eighteenth century and their subsequent migration southward brought them into conflict with the Apaches, who already lived in the region and began migrating themselves to Spanish-dominated Texas and New Mexico. In an attempt to prevent Apache incursions, the Spanish offered them help in their wars with the Comanches, but these efforts generally failed and the Apaches were finally forced out of the Southern Plains by mid-century. The Comanche now dominated the area surrounding the Texas Panhandle, including western Oklahoma and northeastern New Mexico.

Commanche raids into Mexico were a yearly event for many decades, with the warriors seeking weapons, cattle, horses, mules, women, goods and slaves. At least one such raid went so far south into Mexico that the returning raiders spoke of seeing "little men in the trees who would not speak to us" referring to monkeys. The Commanche raids were greatly feared. The Commanche mobility on horseback made these raids unstoppable until their final defeat by the United States. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the Mexican-American War addressed the issue of Commanche raids, and the United States promised to stop the raids, but was not able to do so for many years.

The Comanches maintained an ambiguous relationship with the Europeans and later the Americans attempting to colonize their territory. They were valued as trading partners, but they were also feared for their raids. Similarly, the Comanches were at war at one time or another with virtually every other Native American group living in the Great Plains, leaving opportunities for political maneuvering among the European colonial powers and the United States between the rival groups. At one point, Sam Houston, president of the newly created Republic of Texas, almost succeeded in reaching a peace treaty with the Comanches, but his efforts were thwarted when the Texas legislature refused to create an official boundary between Texas and the Comancheria.

While the Comanches managed to maintain their independence and even increase their territory, by the mid-nineteenth century they faced annihilation because of a wave of epidemics introduced by white settlers. Outbreaks of smallpox (1817, 1848) and cholera (1849) took a major toll on the Comanches, whose population dropped from an estimated 20,000 in mid-century to just a few thousand by the 1870s.

Efforts to move the Comanches into reservations began in the late 1860s with the Treaty of Medicine Lodge (1867), which offered them churches, schools, and annuities in return for a vast tract of land totaling over 60,000 mile (160,000 km). The government promised to stop the buffalo hunters, who were decimating the great herds of the Plains, provided that the Comanches, along with the Apaches, Kiowas, Cheyennes, and Arapahos, moved to a reservation totaling less than 5,000 mile (13,000 km) of land. Nevertheless, the government failed to prevent buffalo hunters from slaughtering the herds, which provoked the Comanches under Isa-tai (White Eagle) to attack a group of hunters in the Texas Panhandle in the Second Battle of Adobe Walls (1874). The attack was a disaster for the Comanches and the army was called in to drive all the remaining Comanche in the area into the reservation. Within just ten years, the buffalo were on the verge of extinction, effectively ending the Comanche way of life as hunters.

Meanwhile, in 1892 the government negotiated the Jerome Agreement, with the Comanches, Kiowas, and Apaches, further reducing their reservation to 480,000 acres (1,940 km) at a cost of $1.25 per acre ($308.88/km), with an allotment of 160 acres (0.6 km) per person per tribe to be held in trust. New allotments were made in 1906 to all children born after the Jerome Agreement, and the remaining land was opened to white settlement. With this new arrangement, the era of the reservation for the Comanches came to an abrupt end.

The Comanches were ill-prepared for life in a modern economic system, and many of them were defrauded of whatever remained of their land and possessions. During World War II, many Comanches left the traditional tribal lands in Oklahoma in search of financial opportunities in the cities of California and the Southwest. Today they are among the most highly educated native groups in the United States. About half the Comanche population still lives in Oklahoma, centered around the town of Lawton. This is the site of the annual pow-wow, when Comanches from across the United States gather to celebrate their heritage and culture.

The above includes excerpts from Wikipedia.org, the free encyclopedia:






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